What an 85 year old’s birthday can teach you about life

Sunday, 9, November, 2014 0 , , , , Permalink 0

Recently, I surprised my family by flying home for my Nana’s 85th birthday. It was a bit risky – surprising an 85 year old – but luckily Nana was thrilled and survived to tell the tale of her eldest (and, of course, favourite) granddaughter travelling cross-country to see her. The truth is - it was an easy decision. She's an amazing lady, my Nana. The epitome of class and grace, she knows every rule of social etiquette and is responsible for my table manners and ability to make pastry from scratch. She has the patience of a saint and an ever-so-subtle habit of being charmingly manipulative when she needs to be. She is a master of the long-lost art of letter writing. ...

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5 Lessons from the Wolf of Wall Street

This week, I took the opportunity to see Jordan Belfort (aka The Wolf of Wall Street) at one of his famous motivational speaking seminars. Like most people, I’d seen the movie and took a vague interest in Jordan’s story, quickly deciding that I did not like the man or what he stood for much at all. But, fraud and moral corruption aside, Jordan has led a pretty extraordinary life and I figured that I’d be pretty close-minded to dismiss the lessons that he had to share at face value. So, I went along. Not surprisingly, the people-watching at this seminar was entertainment enough. A majority of the audience was comprised of suited-up-wolf-wannabes with their highlighted copies of the book ready for Jordan’s ...

Adventure is a path. Real adventure – self-determined, self-motivated, often risky – forces you to have firsthand encounters with the world. The world the way it is, not the way you imagine it. Your body will collide with the earth and you will bear witness. In this way you will be compelled to grapple with the limitless kindness and bottomless cruelty of humankind – and perhaps realize that you yourself are capable of both. This will change you. Nothing will ever again be black-and-white.

— Mark Jenkins